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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/283

Title: HOW SELF-REGULATORY FOUNDATIONS OF RELIGION INFORM ONLINE TEACHING PRACTICE: A STUDY OF HINDU MONKS WHO TEACH ONLINE
Authors: Ramanujan, Shamini
Supervisor(s): Moisey, Susan (CDE); Blodgett-Griffin, (CDE)
Examining Committee: Palalas, Agnieszka (CDE)
Saha, Shandip (Religious Studies)
Bembenutty, Héfer (City University of New York)
Degree: Doctor of Education (EdD) in Distance Education
Department: Centre for Distance Education
Keywords: Self-regulation
Online teaching practice
Educator role
Religious education
Religion
Beliefs
Values
Hinduism
Shaivism
Shaivite
Shaiva Siddhantha
Spirituality
Mindfulness
Ethnographic case study
Issue Date: 10-Jan-2019
Abstract: This ethnographic case study explored how self-regulatory foundations of the educator’s religious beliefs inform online teaching practice. To understand this phenomenon, the culture and practices of five Hindu monks who teach in online environments were studied, adopting observational, interviewing, and artefact analysis for data collection techniques. The seven major themes that were abstracted from the data reveal that (1) spirituality modulates the emotional, cognitive, social, prosocial, dimensions of self- regulation for overall balance; (2) self-regulation comes from an awareness and the movement of life forces and energies within every being; (3) praxis supports a disciplined life in the forms of codes of conduct, responsibilities and life skills throughout one’s lifespan; (4) an educator-student tradition that embraces teacher presence, authentic listening, developing a sensitivity to unspoken words supports self-directedness; (5) self- regulation is a supported process where self and communal support are equally important. (6) adaptivity and responsiveness to the environment in a timely, relevant, meaningful and responsible manner are key characteristics of self-regulation; and (7) feedback and collaboration strengthen educator self-regulation. These findings indicate an acceptance and practice of self-regulation in online teaching as an intricately integrated construct, individualized and yet highly collaborative. The monks’ indiscriminate stance on self- regulation comes from their religion. To the monks, all of life and the universe are based on principles of self-regulation. It is this exact way of being that is translated into their online teaching practice. These findings may deepen our understanding of the influence of an online educator’s personal religious beliefs on their teaching practice.
Graduation Date: Jun-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/283
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